Elegant Ride

Elegant Ride

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and prices.

The Original 30" x 48" Oil painting on canvas is available. Please Contact Me for details.

North Shore Scenic Railroad Crossing the Lester River, Duluth, MN

North Shore Scenic Railroad Crossing the Lester River, Duluth, MN

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and prices.

The Original 24" x 24" Oil painting on canvas is available. Please Contact Me for details.

Fuel for Progress

Fuel for Progress

Fuel for Progress was inspired by a bicycle trip I took on the St. Anthony parkway in NE Minneapolis. I had stopped on an overpass by University Ave to watch the trains and was intrigued by the curving tracks and the motion they implied. I thought, “What if I could paint a train flying around the bend and almost tipping off the track with its speed.” From my viewpoint I could see downtown Minneapolis in the distance. I wanted to include the cityscape into my composition, but realized modern day skyscrapers would not fit with the steam locomotive I had picked for the foreground. I did some research on what Minneapolis would have looked like at the turn of the 20th century. I picked some of my favorite buildings and signage and collaged them into the background. It wasn’t until I was almost done painting the building details that I realized I had picked all bread and beer factories! The piece’s title comes from the idea that the bread and beer manufacturing was fueling the fast paced progress that was screaming us into the future at that point in history.

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and pricing.

Across the Prairie

Across the Prairie

Fargo’s rich history is celebrated in this whimsical piece that highlights the impact of both the Northern Pacific and Great Northern railroads on the city. As the long line of antique boxcars make their way from western North Dakota (in the background) across the prairie and over the Missouri and Sheyenne Rivers, they eventually arrive in downtown Fargo, which is highlighted with a smattering of historically and architecturally significant buildings. Included are the train depots for each railroad line. I included one building however, that is not located in downtown Fargo. In the top right of the painting is North Dakota State University’s famous “Old Main”. It was a bit of a nostalgic choice for me, as I remember it well when I attended NDSU. I enjoyed painting “Across the Prairie” very much as it brought back all the fond memories I have of my college years.

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and pricing.

Lovestory

Lovestory

“Lovestory” is the tale of 2 people meeting and falling in love in the city of Minneapolis told by train imagery.
Her: a rowdy Packers football fan from Wisconsin.
Him: an easy going but devoted Vikings fan from Minnesota.
They are each represented by a different locomotive on a crash course to collide.
Life was good and on an even keel as “his” train drives along at a steady pace from NE Minneapolis (skyline on the left). As he approaches downtown however, his train suddenly dives, does a loop-dee-loop, veers, and flies around to meet “her” train as it comes barreling out of the sky!
The couple met while both working at the Star Tribune newspaper building in downtown Minneapolis (notice the flying newspapers) They had an explosive attraction and not long after, the couple had their first date
(& first kiss!) at the Loon Cafe on 1st Ave. The rest of the painting portrays imagery specific to their lives: their mutual love of Minneapolis icons (like the Grain Belt beer sign), places they frequent, nicknames, and their beloved dog “Jake”. They are now married, but the football rivalry of the Packers vs. the Vikings still remains strong. The inclusion of cows wearing Packer’s jerseys and cheese-heads while the Viking ship rolls onto the football field was a bit of goofy fun that I get to include into a painting once in awhile. It fit this particular couple’s love of life and playful good nature.

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and pricing.

Go West Young Man

Go West Young Man

Go West Young Man was my first train painting and really my first dive into an action oriented, storytelling style that I had been wanting to experiment with for some time. I had recently moved to Minneapolis and became intrigued by the many areas of the city characterized by urban industrialization. This scene is based off of the SOO Line railroad trestle that crosses from NE Minneapolis over the Mississippi River to North Minneapolis just south of the 42nd Ave bridge. I decided to change the bridge to look like a roller coaster to help convey the turbulent history of the people in the photograph: my great-grandma Rose and her husband Don. Rose was deserted during the Great Depression and left with 6 small children to try to feed and take care of all on her own. Times were tough and she would scrub floors, take in laundry, and work anything she could find to put food on the table. Rose knew that Don had headed westward (If you read the graffiti it says, “Go West Young Man”). The painting implies that he headed west on a freight train, emptying his pockets and throwing away the photograph and his old life. The train is spiraling off into an unreachable place because she never saw him again.

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and pricing.

For Love or Money?

For Love or Money?

I was lucky enough to grow up in the era before the internet was born and VCRs had yet to be invented. We really only had one TV station and even that was spotty! Instead, I played in the woods and one of my favorite past times was looking through my father’s art book collection. I would stare for hours at color plates of Charles Russell & Frederic Remington paintings and wonder about the story behind each painting. There was so much implied action with the thundering of horse’s hooves, the lingering smoke from shots fired, the littering of overturned chairs, playing cards tossed about, and liquor bottles and bodies lying in the streets! What was going on?! It was great fodder for the imagination and I wanted to be able to paint like that! “For Love or Money?” is my ode to the great western landscape painters that I had admired so much, done in the style of my train series. I wanted to capture that sense of the story exploding off the canvas and bring as much action to a still, 2 dimensional surface, as possible. Most paintings from this era have a decidedly masculine feel to them and I’d like to think that my rendition has a slightly more feminine edge with a dash of the whimsical vs. sinister. This is also the first time I’ve titled a piece with a question. When the observer reads the title, “For Love or Money?”, they are asked to examine the details within the painting and determine why the cowboys are robbing the train in the first place. Was it to nab all the money from the cargo car that they so foolishly blew up? Or was it to kidnap one of the lovely ladies in the first passenger car? You be the judge!

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and prices.

The Original 36" x 60" Oil painting on canvas is available. Please Contact Me for details.

Journey of the Barrel Raft Boys

Journey of the Barrel Raft Boys

This piece is a commemorative painting that tells the story of 2 young men from Stillwater, MN that designed and built their own barrel raft completely from scratch (featured in the bottom right of the painting). They launched it into the St. Croix River, hooked into the Mississippi River, and spent 8 weeks floating the length of the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico. The days would flow by, punctuated by passing barges and river paddle boats and countless bridges. In the top right of the painting you will see a couple of noteworthy bridges from St. Louis, Memphis, and Baton Rouge. River travel at night was too dangerous given the steady barge traffic so the boys would pull up on a sand bar and enjoy the spectacular river sunsets while they ate dinner over a campfire. The trip had a very “Mark Twain-ness” to it and I wanted to subtly highlight this in the painting. One of the paddle boats they passed during their trip was the “Tom Sawyer” so it was an obvious choice to include! They passed the days reading books and fishing so a copy of “Huckleberry Finn” and a fishing pole with a daredevil lure made it into the composition. The motto that they had informally adopted for the spirit of their trip was a famous Mark Twain quote. I wanted to include it into the painting, but I didn’t want it to look like a motivational poster so I hid it within the graffiti. If you look closely at the train you will see the coal car is labeled M.T.R.R. (Mark Twain Rail Road) engine #1692 (signifying the 1692 total river miles they traveled). If you read the graffiti backwards starting at the first box car it reads, “Life is short, break the rules, forgive quickly, kiss slowly, love truly, laugh uncontrollably, and never regret anything that makes you smile.” To add some visual interest and give the painting a storybook feel, I added the flying pages in the top left corner. Included are actual newspaper stories of their journey that were published by the St. Paul Pioneer Press (just before launch), and the Alton Telegraph (a reporter met them at the Alton public docks on the day they floated into town). The bottom rolled up paper represents blueprints and features some of their barrel raft construction drawings and weight/water distribution calculations. All in all, this was a very fun piece to paint! I got to vicariously go on my own journey down the Mississippi as I listened to stories about their trip and translated them into a painting they will pass down to their children, and the generations to follow. If you’d like to know more about their trip you can visit the website they set up for it at www.barrelraftboys.com

Archival giclee prints on canvas (stretched on bars and ready to hang) are available in a variety of sizes. Please Contact Me for sizes and pricing.